Wed

24

Jun

2015

Magic and fairies: Sanziene, the midsummer celebration in Romania

Romania celebrates the Sanziene (also known as Dragaica) on June 24, a pagan tradition which coincides with the Orthodox holiday of the birth of Ioan Botezatorul (St. John the Baptist –  so, happy name day to all named Ion/Ioana!). This day also marks the middle of summer and celebrates nature and fecundity.Under the popular belief, Sanzienele were considered to be some beautiful women living in the woods or fields unexplored by man. According to the tradition, Sanzienele float in the air or walk on the ground on the night of June 23 to June 24, dancing and singing. The skies open on this magical night and miracles can happen.Unlike Rusalii (the Pentecost), which are bad fantasy beings, Sanziele are believed to be good fairies. However, they can turn into bad forces if this day is not respected, and they can start storms and bring hail, leaving the field without crops and the flowers without cure.

According to the Romanian tradition, in the morning of Sanziene, people were gathering bouquets of the flowers with the same name, make wreaths, and threw them on the roof. It was believed that the person would have a long life if the wreath remained on the roof.

Also, during the night before Sanziene, women make wreaths with the same flowers, and place them under their pillows, to dream of their future husband.

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Fri

19

Jun

2015

Dissemination of the project for parents of children from kindergarten

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Wed

17

Jun

2015

Spanish dances performed by romanian children from Gradinita Speciala Falticeni

Tue

19

May

2015

Estonian dances performed by romanian children from Gradinita Speciala Falticeni

Tue

05

May

2015

School in a diferent way!

Wed

29

Apr

2015

TURKISH DANCES PERFORMED BY ROMANIAN CHILDREN

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Sun

12

Apr

2015

Easter Day in Romania

Sun

08

Mar

2015

The Celebration of Women in Romania

MOTHERS’ DAY

in Romania is celebrated on the 8th of March, which is also the International Women’s Day.

Sun

01

Mar

2015

Mărțișor

Mărțișor  is a Romanian celebration at the beginning of spring, on March the 1st  in Romania,Moldova, and all territories inhabited by Romanians. Alike, though not identical customs can be found in Bulgaria (see Martenitsa), while similar ones exist in Albania, and Italy.

The name Mărțișor is the diminutive of marț, the old folk name for March (Martie, in modern Romanian), and thus literally means "little March". It is also the folk name for this month.

Mărțișor, marț and mărțiguș are all names for the red and white string from which a small decoration is tied, and which is offered by people on the 1st day of March. The string can also be black and white, or blue and white) Giving this talisman to people is an old custom, and it is believed that the one who wears the red and white string will be strong and healthy for the year to come. It is also a symbol of the coming spring. Usually, both women and men wear it pinned to their clothes, close to the heart, until the last day of March, when they tie it to the branches of a fruit-tree. In some regions, a gold or silver coin hangs on the string, which is worn around the neck. After wearing it for a certain period of time, they buy red wine and sweet cheese with the coin, according to a belief that their faces would remain beautiful and white as cheese, and rubicund as the red wine, for the entire year.

In modern times, and especially in urban areas, the Mărțișor lost most of its talisman properties and became more of a symbol of friendship or love, appreciation and respect. The black threads were replaced with red, but the delicate wool ropes are still a ‘cottage industry’ among people in the countryside, who comb out the wool, dye the floss, and twist it into thousands of tassels. In some areas the amulets are still made with black and white ropes, for warding off evil. A very popular symbol in relation to Martisor is the snowdrop flower, which is also considered in Romania symbol for spring time.

Tue

24

Feb

2015

Dragobetele or Romania’s traditional celebration of love

Dragobete is a traditional Romanian holiday originating from Dacian times. 

 

Western Europeans and Americans  may have St Valentine’s day, but traditionally Romania has its own special day for lovers, celebrated on February 24, so 10 days after Valentine’s. It’s called Dragobete.

Dragobete was the son of the old lady called Baba Dochia, who marks the return of spring. Dragobete’s other name is the bird’s fiance or ‘head of the spring’, because it too marks the beginning of spring.

On Dragobete, girls and boys dressed in holiday suits usually meet in front of the church and go searching for spring flowers. Then, they sit and talk around the fires lit on the hills in the village. At noon, the girls go back to the village running, each followed by the boy who fell in love with her. If the boy catches the girl he chose, and if the girl likes him, they will kiss in front of everybody. This kiss signals their engagement for one year, and Dragobete is an opportunity to show an attachment in front of the community. The traditional saying is that Dragobetele kisses the girls (Dragobetele saruta fetele in Romanian).

In some areas of Romania, married women have to wash their faces with snow so that spring finds them joyful and healthy. Another custom is for a young girl to eat a salty bread baked by the eldest woman in the household, then place some basil under their pillow. During the night, if they are to get married withing 12 months, they’ll dream their future husband. The explanation is that the salty bread would make them thirsty and they’d dream of a man who brings them water.

Fri

19

Dec

2014

Romanian traditional dances

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Fri

12

Dec

2014

Welcome to Romania Second Meeting

Mon

01

Dec

2014

1 December- Romania's National Day





1 Ddecember 1918 -

Unification Day

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Thu

27

Nov

2014

BULGARIAN DANCES PERFORMED BY ROMANIAN CHILDREN

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Tue

04

Nov

2014

Halloween in our kindergarten

Wed

15

Oct

2014

Romanian Logo

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